Laws Protecting People and Animals in the City of Los Angeles
Los Angeles Neighborhood Watch Network
Los Angeles Neighborhood Watch  
Citizens that want a safe Community for our Families.
Friday, September 22, 2017
 Crime
Prevention
Sign Up Public Information Start a
Watch
Neighborhood Watch block captain Public Safety Safe Cities Wanted
 

Los Angeles City
ANIMAL SERVICES
Neighborhood Resources
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

City Laws Protecting People and Animals in Los Angeles


Over the years, the City of Los Angeles has sought to improve conditions 'for animals and people by creating and supporting laws that govern the care of animals and their interactions with humans. Many of these laws are found in the Los Angeles Municipal Code ("LAMC"), and some are found in State law. (Read the law for a full description, including exceptions.) Los Angeles Animal Services is responsible to enforce the laws. Here is a brief summary of the key laws affecting LA's animals and their owners:

The following are basic guidelines for the care and treatment of animals, including laws as set forth in federal, state, county and City of Los Angeles Municipal Code sections.
This is not intended as legal advice. Direct your specific questions regarding laws to your local animal control agency.

LOST PETS

If you have lost a pet, go to all animal shelters in your area at least every two days to look for your animal.

FOUND PETS

If you find a lost pet, you must take it to an animal shelter in the area so that the owner can locate and claim it.
YOU MAY NOT KEEP A PET YOU'VE FOUND WITHOUT COMPLYING WITH LEGAL REQUIREMENTS FOR LOCATING THE OWNER.
You must provide any pet you find with humane care, including prompt veterinary care if it is injured or ill, or take it to a shelter for immediate care.

CARE & ATTENTION

Any animal neglected, abandoned or kept without food, water or proper care and attention will be removed by the Department 0f Animal Services and the owner cited.
(LAMC 53.10)

FOOD & WATER

Pets must be provided with adequate food and water.
Water should be available at all times and should be placed  in an area where it will not become overheated in the summer or frozen in the winter.     

SHELTER   

Dogs should be provided with a shelter covered on the sides, including a roof and floor raised off  the ground adequately to prevent flooding by water during rain

Animal Abuse and Cruelty

Abusing or failing to properly care for any animal is against the law and is punishable with fines and possible jail time. This includes participation in dog and cock fighting. L.A. Animal Services is constantly on the lookout for evidence of abuse, and the Animal Cruelty Task Force works with the City Attorney and District Attorney to investigate and prosecute abuse and cruelty cases. You can call to report cruelty at 213-847-1417.
Various State and local laws.

ABANDONMENT

It is a misdemeanor to abandon any animal in the State of California.
ANIMALS MAY NOT BE DUMPED (PERMANENTLY LEFT) IN ANY PUBLIC OR PRIVATE AREAS NOR ON THE STREETS OR HIGHWAY.
If you do not wish to keep your pet and cannot find a suitable, responsible home to adopt it, take it to your local animal shelter. (LAMC 53.12) (PC 597s)

Animals Left in Cars

You may not leave an animal in any unattended motor vehicle under conditions (such as heat, cold, lack of ventilation or water) that endanger the health of the animal or may be· expected to cause suffering or death.
State Penal Code 597.7.

Anti-Tethering Laws

Dog owners who tie up their animals for long periods of time or deny them the proper level of water and shelter face stiff financial penalties. State law specifically sets a limit: dogs may not be tied, chained, or otherwise restrained to a stationary object for more than 3 hours in a 24-hour period. Under State law, violations could result in an infraction or misdemeanor punishable by a fine up to $1,000 per dog and/or six months in jail.
Section 53.70 of the LAMC.

Barking Dogs

You cannot allow your dog to bother your neighbors with excessive barking. Failure to control barking that unreasonably interferes with your neighbors could lead to the imposition of strict conditions by LA Animal Services, or eventually you could lose your your dog and lose the right to own a dog for three years.
Section 53.63 of the LAMC.

Breeding

If you breed your animal, whether on purpose or by accident, you must obtain a breeding permit, which costs $100.
Section 53.15.2 of the LAMC.

Dangerous Dogs

It is illegal to allow your dog to assault, menace or threaten another person or other animal. Failure to control your dog could result in losing your dog and the right to own a dog for three years.
Section 53.34 of the LAMC.

Dog Poop

Dog owners are required to clean up after their dogs when taking them out in public. Failure to do so could lead to stiff fines. Bring a bag when you take your dog for a walk!
Section 53.49 of the LAMC

Keeping Animals Outdoors

L.A. Animal Services sets the minimum distance that all animals (except horses) may be kept from houses, schools, businesses, and other buildings. Dogs, cats, rabbits, and farm animals must be kept 35 feet from the owner's house, and 75 feet from all other buildings. Rules and distances for keeping horses are similar, but are set in the Land Use section of the LAMC, Section 12.00.
Section 53.59 of the LAMC.

Leash Law

If you take or allow your dog off your property or place of residence, you must have him or her on a leash. Failure to do so could result in a stiff fine. There are a number of dog parks in the city where it is legal to let your dog off-leash, but no beaches at present.
Section 53.06 of the LAMC.

Licensing

All dogs residing in the City must be licensed. Horses must also have a license, which costs $14 per year. A license for a spayed or neutered dog costs $15 per year, while a license for an unaltered dog costs $100 per year. Contact L.A. Animal Services for information for City free and subsidized spay and neutering services and vouchers.
Section 53.15 of the LAMC.

Micro-chip

Getting your dog micro-chipped makes identification and return of a lost pet quick and easy if he or she ends up in the possession of L.A. Animal Services. Also, as part of the new law requiring "spay or neuter of dogs and cats, any dog or cat that is exempt from the requirement and remains intact must be micro-chipped.
Section 53.15.2 of the LAMC.

No Feeding Urban Wildlife

You may not feed "non-domesticated mammalian predators" (for example, coyotes, foxes, possums, raccoons and skunks) outdoors. Violating this law is a misdemeanor and can subject you to fines.
Section 53.06.05 of the LAMC, along with State law.

Selling Animals

There are strict laws restricting the selling of animals within the City of Los Angeles. Outdoor and sidewalk sales are generally prohibited and sales of dogs and cats require special permits from L.A. Animal Services. Selling animals usually also requires obtaining a business license from the City of Los Angeles.
Section 53.42 of the LAMC, and other LAMC sections.

Spay and Neuter

All dogs and cats residing in the City of Los Angeles must be spayed or neutered unless they meet certain medical criteria, are active show or service dogs. or are licensed for breeding purposes. Stiff fines and penalties can be assessed for persistent failure to comply. If you adopted your dog or cat from an animal shelter, state law requires that it be spayed or neutered before you will be allowed to take it home unless there is a valid medical reason for delaying the surgery.
Section 53.15.2 of the LAMC.

RABIES CONTROL

Any dog over four (4) months of age is required to have a
current rabies vaccination. (LAMC 53.51.)
You must be able to produce the documentation upon request. (LAMC 53.24)

GUARD DOGS

Any dog kept, used or maintained on any commercial or industrial premises to guard, protect, patrol or defend any property or person is subject to special provisions,
immunizations, licensing and regulations. (LAMC 53.66)
Contact the Department of Animal Services for information on Guard Dog laws.

DOGS IN TRUCKS

No animal may be transported on a street or highway in the back of a truck or other vehicle unless the animal is cross-tethered (restrained from two sides),
secured in a carrier or cage, or the space is enclosed or has side and tail racks at least 46 inches high so that the animal may not jump, fall or be thrown out:
(Veh. 23117.a) (See Veh.23117.b for exceptions)

POISONING

No person shall place any poisonous substance in a place accessible to animals or birds with the intent to kill or harm them. (PC596) (LAMC 53.41) .

ANIMALS AS FOOD

Pet  animals or any traditional companion  animals may not be used, sold or given away for the purpose of using it as food. (Misdemeanor) (PC 598b)

DOG FIGHTING

Anyone who possesses, keeps or trains any dog with the intention of engaging in any exhibition of fIghting with another dog or
any one who causes any dog to fight with another dog is guilty of a felony. Anyone who is a spectator at such an exhibition of dog fighting is guilty of a misdemeanor. (PC597)

ANIMAL FIGHTING OTHER THAN DOGS

Possessing training devices or causing any animals or birds (including fIghting cocks) to fIght or being a spectator at such an event is a misdemeanor (PC 597).

OTHER ANIMALS

Fowl and other animals (other than cats, dogs, canaries and birds of the Psittacine family) must be kept at least 35 feet from any dwelling, restaurant or food establishment
and 100 feet from any school, hospital, or similar institution. (L. A. County Code Sec. 11.16.090.)

Any crowing rooster, gamecock, turkey, guinea hen, peacock, goose, duck or other fowl capable of loud crowing or like noise, shall be kept at least 100 feet from any
dwelling, residence or living quarters of persons other than their owner. (LAMC 40.03)

BURIAL OF ANIMALS

No dead animal or fowl may be buried in the City of Los Angeles except in an established cemetery. (LAMC 53.62)
Report Dead Animals to the Bureau of Sanitation,
Department of Public works: 1-800-773-CITY.

CHAINING TETHERING

Humane requirements for maintaining a dog on a chain, rope or leash vary according to the size of the dog and other circumstances.
Chaining or tethering is not a desirable means of confining any dog for long periods and should be avoided whenever possible.
If it is necessary to restrain a dog in this manner for limited periods, an overhead, sliding cable that can be attached to a halter on the dog
is usually the safest and most humane method. If the dog is chained, the chain or tether should be long enough to permit adequate movement
and exercise and be affixed so that the dog cannot become entangled or injured.
The chain/leash must permit the animal access to adequate shelter, food and water.
(Contact your local animal control agency for specific rules. Some cities and/or communities do not allow chaining.) (PC597t.)
No dog should be chained or tethered in an open area where it may be attacked by other animals or approached by strangers.

ANYONE WHO MALICIOUSLY AND INTENTIONALLY MAIMS, MUTILATES, TORTURES OR WOUNDS A LIVING ANIMAL, OR MALICIOUSLY AND
INTENTIONALLY KILLS AN ANIMAL IS GUILTY OF AN OFFENSE
PUNISHABLE BY IMPRISONMENT IN THE STATE PRISON
OR BY A FINE OF NOT MORE THAN $20,000,
OR BOTH FINE AND IMPRISONMENT. (PC 597.)

 

 

City Services
Police Stations
Fire Stations
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Return to Home Page

WE are organized and fighting back and we will not go away.
This is our city of
Los Angeles.

Got an
Emergency CALL 911